Support World Kidney Day at Lourdes

Posted on March 10, 2017

Did you know that 10% of the population worldwide is impacted by some form of kidney damage? Support World Kidney Day at Lourdes!

On Thursday March 9th we are celebrating the 12th edition of World Kidney Day (WKD), a joint initiative organized by the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations (IFKF). WKD is the most widely celebrated event focused on kidney health across the globe. This year’s theme “Kidney Disease and Obesity” promotes education on the harmful consequences of obesity and its association with kidney disease, advocating a healthy lifestyle and healthcare strategy recommendations that tackle the magnitude of the burden of obesity and kidney disease.

Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic. In 2014 over 600 million people worldwide were affected by obesity and this number is expected to increase by 40% or more in the next decade. Obesity and overweight constitute the fifth highest risk factor for adult global deaths. This is because obesity, as it is well-known, is a risk factor of diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease.

A less well-recognized (but equally important) complication of obesity is Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Obesity may cause chronic kidney disease through various ways. On the one hand, it could contribute to it indirectly, by inducing or worsening diabetes and hypertension, themselves well-recognized risk factors of kidney disease. On the other hand, obesity could also cause kidney damage directly, by placing an unduly high burden on the kidneys over many years (a larger body needs more kidney function after all), and also by causing harmful metabolic changes such as inflammation and oxidation.

It is estimated that 13,8% of CKD in men and 24,9% of CKD in women in industrialized countries may be associated with overweight or obesity. Besides it’s now well-recognized association with chronic kidney disease, obesity has also been recognized to be a risk factor for kidney stones, and for various types of cancers like kidney cancer and others. Individuals affected by obesity have an 83% increased risk of CKD compared to individuals with a healthy weight.

It is now clear that successful weight loss can result in improved control of diabetes and of high blood pressure, and it can lower the risk for developing chronic kidney disease.

The best means to fight chronic kidney disease is prevention: it is thus paramount to identify and to treat all of its possible risk factors, such as obesity. Obesity is preventable and treatable, but reversing the tide will require concerted efforts not just from healthcare providers, but from the entire society.” – Dr. Csaba Kovesdy, Professor of Nephrology at University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, US and Chief of Nephrology at the Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center

This year the World Kidney Day promotes education on the harmful consequences of obesity and its association with kidney disease, advocating a healthy lifestyle and healthcare strategy recommendations to tackle the magnitude of the burden of obesity and kidney disease.